Artist of the Week – Brittney Howe

February 5, 2012 § 6 Comments

Brittney Howe

“I have always had a passion for horses and how they work: the muscle connecting to the ligaments, the ligaments to the bones. Creatures so strong yet so delicate, and yet they move with such grace. Power-driven hind quarters fuel their bodies with grace and finesse; they become like butter in your hands, all 1200 pounds melting together with you… When riding my horse, my heart is no longer following the rhythm of my body, but beats with his: we become one. Imagine the greatest moment of peace you’ve ever experienced, then, multiply that by a million, and you may begin to have a glimpse of the pure joy I receive from these majestic creatures.”

Originally from Delhi, Ontario, Brittney tells us she’d always had a gift for drawing. Intrigued after discussing various arts programs with a Rep from the Peterborough Campus, Brittney decided HSTA was the place for her. From the moment she set her steel-toe-booted foot on the concrete floor of the blacksmith shop, she knew exactly what she wanted in life: to be an artist.  Manipulating and forming metal utterly fascinated her, she says: “How it starts off hard, and once yellow-hot is malleable like clay; you’re able to do anything with it.” She realized that not only did she possess a gift for drawing, but also for 3-dimensional sculpture, in particular the noble equus. “Throughout this past year, I have been diligently studying the horse: uncovering every bone, exploring every muscle, revealing new forms to better express its complex anatomy,” explains Brittney. “My study has included multiple sketches and image transfers, and 3D sculptural creations of tile and clay.”

Being pushed out of her comfort zone, she says, was the best thing that ever happened to her. Exploring different materials, different mediums, allows her “free rein” over her creativity and boundless possibilities in her work. “Once I felt comfortable with my understanding of how the horse was made, I began to create sculptures of these magnificent creatures out of scrap metals such as brass, copper and mild steel. Just as my initial study of horses began, my works are finished in the same way: layer by layer, manipulating the various metals to lend shape and form..”

  After she has completed her Ceramics and Glassblowing courses next year, she plans on setting up her own mixed-media studio called “In His Image Creations Inc.”. Without jumping the gun, she reminds us that metal is where it all began. “Combining copper, brass and mild steel to create an abundance of colour fascinates me. To be able to fashion life from the various forms and shapes of scrap [metal] pieces… taking a bare substance, manipulating it with heat to mould and shape my work, and create life, gives me purpose.” But, glass and ceramics require heat as well – perhaps she’s on to something? We can only wait and wonder at what the promising Miss Howe can come up with next…

You can catch Brittney’s feature article in an upcoming issue of The Anvil’s Ring.

Brittney can be reached at 705-457-0207 or via email at bv.howe@hotmail.com

Artist of the Week

January 28, 2012 § 1 Comment

Ian Turner

“There’s a photograph of my sister and I, taken when we were still quite young, as we painted watercolour masterpieces along the shoreline of our family cottage on Georgian Bay. The photograph, as well as the painting that I made that day, have been perpetually preserved, laminated side-by-side into a placemat. On the underside is another watercolour I made around the same age:  a copy of a Tom Thomson waterfall from the McMichael Canadian Collection. The placemat is sort of faded now; bits of dry macaroni and cheese give it a rough texture. It doesn’t look like much, but thinking of it now, it represents the foundation of my artistic life.”  Ian Turner

I graduated from high school a year after my classmates, following a botched attempt at becoming a professional cyclist. A fresh start and new direction were required: I jumped the first freight train headed for Vancouver, intent on studying science at Simon Fraser University. Perhaps not quite so intent after all, as alas! I spent too much time on sketching trips in the mountains and not enough time studying chemical formulae… They sent me packing, needless to say, precipitating my return home to Toronto, now somewhat rankled and directionless. What seems like an obvious conclusion to my apathetic state was much less clear at the time, when I hesitantly – to put it mildly – signed up for a few art courses in the city. I was lucky and had good teachers; I met with positive feedback and encouragement.

I came to the Haliburton School of The Arts – Fleming College last fall with a desire for a thorough grounding in drawing and painting: to be beat over the head with the fundamentals, like an apprentice in Michelangelo’s studio. What I greatly appreciated about the school was the friendly intimacy and lack of pretension that might have turned me away from a larger institution, much like a young Claude Monet turning a cold shoulder to the Académie.

I don’t imagine any artist can ever ignore or escape from the influences of their childhood, even if they wanted to. The work of men such as Tom Thomson, Lawren Harris, and J.E.H. MacDonald, will always hold a special place in my heart, and rightly so. But, as I have grown and my creative vision and personal awareness have widened, I have felt the need to stretch. My inspiration as an artist comes from a wide appreciation of artists throughout history and in my current practice I am exploring styles from the Renaissance to the Abstract Expressionists, in order to develop a more intimate relationship with art history. With so much information available to us, with the evolution of the Internet, our shrinking world, and the greater availability of books and publications, we, as artists, have access to more knowledge and inspiration within our field than ever before.

Presently working out of a studio in Toronto which, in a former life, was best known as my sister’s bedroom – one of the perks to having a sibling studying out-of-province – I am applying myself with my characteristic conscientious enthusiasm, haunting the halls of the Art Gallery of Ontario, and slowly laying waste to my bank account with open studio life drawing/painting sessions across the city.

This coming Fall, I will begin my studies in Art History at the University of Toronto, questing ambitiously after my Muse. Though in all due modesty, I find myself less and less prone to chancing upon a book touching on art or an artist that I have yet to read.

Look out for me at Exhibitions in the near future. In addition, I, like many of my illustrious apotheosized forbears, am always grateful for commissions.

A handshake in thought,                                                                                                                                                                                      Ian Turner

Interested parties may contact Mr. Turner by phone at 416 423 5526 

Artist of the Week

January 28, 2012 § Leave a comment

Fleming College – Haliburton School of the Arts has so many great and talented individuals walk through these halls that we decided it was time to showcase them.

Starting now, once a week, we will feature our “Artist of the Week”: a real, living breathing artist that, at one time, attended one or more of our programs. Quite often, the artist will have their own website so be sure to follow the links!

If you are a former student (or know one!) and would like to be featured on our blog, let us know! We’d love to hear from you!

 

Fibre Arts Grad awarded and featured in 9th Annual Rural & Northern Art Show

December 16, 2011 § Leave a comment

Fibre Arts graduate Hilary Omichinski’s corset was included in the 9th Annual Rural & Northern Art Show (Sept. 6 -Oct. 2nd 2011)as it was the winner of the Fibre Arts category at the Eastman Judged Art Exhibition held in Niverville, Manitoba.

Hilary studied Apparel Technolgy at Olds College in Olds, Alberta and Fibre Arts at the Haliburton School of The Arts, and she noted “the corset was a great way to amalgamate the two areas of study and bring them back to my home province.”

Hilary has since taught fibre dyeing classes at her former high school and used the corset as an example of how textile design and garment design may be combined.

Here is a link to the show.

Convocation 2011 at HSTA

June 7, 2011 § 1 Comment

“A convocation brings things full circle”

– Fleming College president Tony Tilly.

Held on May 27th, the 2011 convocation ceremony at the Fleming College Haliburton campus was a celebration of beginnings for graduates from the Visual and Creative Arts diploma, art certificates and post-graduate certificates. Students from all walks of life had embarked on a shared journey that began through their enrolment in to courses at HSTA that, now completed, found them at another new beginning – embarking on a future with their training and college experience under their belts. Andrew Hodgson, a Board of Governors member, echoed Tilly’s remarks and added, “I want to thank you for being a part of our community and I hope that you can stay,” he said.

Heidi Hudspith, a HSTA employee and  Alumni representative, welcomed the graduates to the alumni association saying, “I know firsthand you all worked so hard to be here today.” Hudspith also received the 2011 President’s Part-Time Staff Recognition Award from Tony Tilly.

The Fellowship in Applied Education Award was presented to Fay Wilkinson, who is the Expressive Arts Coordinator, HSTA faculty and an active community volunteer responsible for the recently created Visible Voices initiative at the Haliburton Arts Council. “I’ve learned so much over the years. I know that when relationships are built the most unlikely people say yes,” said Wilkinson. “I’m deeply, deeply grateful for what I learned at this college and for going into this community and being accepted.”

Photo Arts and Digital Image Design Graduate Fanny Gadouas gave a valedictorian address before principal Sandra Dupret delivered the ceremony’s final words: “I’m so proud to have you all as a part of our campus, best of luck.”

HSTA Alumni featured in Muskoka Magazine May 2011

May 15, 2011 § Leave a comment

The May issue of Muskoka Magazine features recent alumnus, Joy McCormack.  Joy attend the Drawing & Painting Program in fall of 2010.  She has promoted HSTA’s programs since the moment she walked through our doors through conversations with others, presenting her experience at Huntsville Rotary, and now in her recent coverage in Muskoka mag.

Muskoka Issue – Page 1

Muskoka Issue – Page 2

Muskoka Issue – Page 3

Shanghai Cowgirl – Exhibition May 1st to May 31 2011

April 15, 2011 § Leave a comment

You’re Invited!  To an exhibition of photography, by John  Davidson and Corin Ford Forrester -an HSTA Alumni of our Photo Arts Certificate, during the month of May in Toronto.  They’d love it  if you could join them for the opening reception May 1st from 5-8pm at  Shanghai Cowgirl (restaurant) 538 Queen St. West (east of Bathhurst). 

For more information on Corin,  you can check out www.corinfordforrester.com.

Alumni Spotlight: Deborah Murphy

April 12, 2011 § Leave a comment

Image:  Beans from Kitchen on Canvas

HSTA- VCAD and Glassblowing alumni, Deb Murphy, has recently been announced as an artist-in-residence at the newly resurrected Art in the Park at Pukaskwa National Park. Deborah will be in residence Friday, June 3 – Wednesday, June 8, 2011.

Approaching 60 and obsessing with the transience of life, Deborah resurrects life’s rejects in the materials she uses – from the fungi in her Gooderham, ON yard to the electrical wiring from her husband’s work to the windows from her godparents’ home.  “My art escapes me with the force of a robust fart that refuses to be contained; accompanied by laughter and protests of surprise,” she says.  Pukaskwa can’t wait to spend some time laughing with Deborah this spring! While in residence, Deborah will be offering workshops (Details to TBA.)

The resurrection all started with a local artist prompting, begging, nagging staff at the Park to bring back Pukaskwa’s Art in the Park program. They listened, and there’s no better year for it – this year marks 100 years for the world’s FIRST national parks system. Parks Canada is celebrating its 100th, and HSTA is proud that Deb is a part of it.

Pukaskwa located at the end of Highway 627, 15km south of the TransCanada Highway 17. The closest communities are Pic River First Nation and Heron Bay, also on Highway 627, and Marathon,a 25 minute drive west of the park. It is a 4.5 hour drive northwest of Sault Ste. Marie, ON and a 3.5 hour drive east of Thunder Bay.

Pukaskwa is a spectacular wilderness park located on the most rugged and wild section of the Lake Superior coast. Tucked into this shoreline is the 67-site Hattie Cove Campground. Known for its quiet and intimate feel, Hattie Cove is the sort of hidden gem the pulls visitors back year after year. But , Lake Superior makes its own weather. Even in the summer months, visitors should expect cool temperatures. Daytime highs rarely go higher than 25°C and evenings can be chilly around the fire. On the bright side, the days there are long!

Congrats again Deb!

Meet & Mingle – Mar. 22 @ McKecks

March 4, 2011 § Leave a comment

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